In my training as a biomedical communicator, I developed proficiency at communicating scientific content using a range of visual media.

Each project shown below involved a significant research stage to understand the content, and several design iterations before the final product was created.

One of the first projects I created was a carbon dust drawing of the bones of the foot, created under the guidance of Professor Dave Mazierski at the University of Toronto.

Carbon dust of the bones of the foot
Bones of the Foot, by Christine P'ng




I also explored a range of rendering styles, including one of my favourites: cell-shading. This presentation slide was created to illustrate one of the proposed mechanisms of action of Anthracycline, a breast cancer drug. It was created under the guidance of Professor Michael Corrin at the University of Toronto, and in collaboration with Dr. Marsela Braunstein at the Ontario Institute of Cancer Research.

The design of this project focused on developing a visually engaging story with minimal textual components, in order to keep an audience focused on the presenter’s explanation, rather than the slide.

Cell-shaded depiction of cancer cells being attacked by anthracycline
Illustration of a proposed mechanism of action for Anthracycline, by Christine P'ng




I also learned how to use 3D modelling software to illustrate scientific content. In this project I chose to model a human enzyme involved in DNA winding, topoisomerase. This project was created under the guidance of Professor Nick Woolridge, at the University of Toronto.

3D rendering of topoisomerase
Topoisomerase, by Christine P'ng